Radon

86
Rn
Group
18
Period
6
Block
p
Protons
Electrons
Neutrons
86
86
136
General Properties
Atomic Number
86
Atomic Weight
[222]
Mass Number
222
Category
Noble gases
Colour
Colorless
Radioactive
Yes
The name was derived from radium; called niton at first, from the Latin word nitens meaning shining
Crystal Structure
n/a
History
Radon was discovered in 1900 by Friedrich Ernst Dorn in Halle, Germany.

He reported some experiments in which he noticed that radium compounds emanate a radioactive gas.

In 1910, Sir William Ramsay and Robert Whytlaw-Gray isolated radon, determined its density, and determined that it was the heaviest known gas.
Electrons per shell
2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8
Electron Configuration
[Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p6
Rn
Upon condensation, radon glows because of the intense radiation it produces
Physical Properties
Phase
Gas
Density
0.00973 g/cm3
Melting Point
202 K | -71.15 °C | -96.07 °F
Boiling Point
211.3 K | -61.85 °C | -79.33 °F
Heat of Fusion
3 kJ/mol
Heat of Vaporization
17 kJ/mol
Specific Heat Capacity
0.094 J/g·K
Abundance in Earth's crust
n/a
Abundance in Universe
n/a
Illustration
Image Credits: Images-of-elements
Illustration of radon
CAS Number
10043-92-2
PubChem CID Number
24857
Atomic Properties
Atomic Radius
120 pm
Covalent Radius
150 pm
Electronegativity
-
Ionization Potential
10.7485 eV
Atomic Volume
50.5 cm3/mol
Thermal Conductivity
0.0000364 W/cm·K
Oxidation States
2, 4, 6
Applications
Radon is used in hydrologic research that studies the interaction between ground water and streams.

Radon has been produced commercially for use in radiation therapy.

Radon has been used in implantable seeds, made of gold or glass, primarily used to treat cancers.
Radon is highly radioactive and a carcinogen
Isotopes
Stable Isotopes
-
Unstable Isotopes
195Rn, 196Rn, 197Rn, 198Rn, 199Rn, 200Rn, 201Rn, 202Rn, 203Rn, 204Rn, 205Rn, 206Rn, 207Rn, 208Rn, 209Rn, 210Rn, 211Rn, 212Rn, 213Rn, 214Rn, 215Rn, 216Rn, 217Rn, 218Rn, 219Rn, 220Rn, 221Rn, 222Rn, 223Rn, 224Rn, 225Rn, 226Rn, 227Rn, 228Rn